2018 Columbia River Gorge Calendars and Note Cards

Oregon Landscape Photography Notre Cards

2018 Columbia River Gorge Calendars and Note Cards

2018 Columbia River Gorge 12 Month Calendar - $20.00 <-- CLICK HERE

4-Packs of photo note cards - $10 <--- CLICK HERE

In light of the recent Eagle Creek fire in the Columbia River Gorge I have decided to dedicate my 2018 calendar to all gorge photos. There are certain places that will never look the same as they did before. I still have some left so gt them while you can. These calendars are of a very high quality offset printing. They come saddle stitched so they lay flat. The photos are 8" x 10".

The note cards are 4 1/4" x 5 1/2". They're blank inside so that you can write your own message. They come four to a package, with envelopes. Each card has a different scene.

  • Punchbowl at Eagle Creek
  • A Fisherman at Trillium Lake
  • Mount Hood with rhododendrons
  • Multnomah Falls

Supplies are limited so act now.

Thank you all so very much for your support.  🙂

 

 

Camera Basics Refresher

Family Fishing Photo

Camera Basics Refresher

Well, it’s a new year and Christmas has come and gone. With the popularity of photography lately I’m sure that there will be some readers who have received the gift that they wanted, a new digital camera. Because of this I have decided to brush up on how to use it to more of its potential. So let’s talk about manual camera operation.

You have a new camera that, unlike your phone’s camera, was designed exclusively for making photos. I am going to assume that the reason that you wanted your new camera was to make photos that are even better than you could with your cell phone. To do this you will need to move away from the point and shoot mindset and decide to be the computer that controls the camera instead. Switch to Manual Mode.

Let’s start with the “Big 3”. Exposure time - Aperture Setting - ISO/Film Speed. When you’re taking a photo you will want to understand what all three are, how to control them and how they affect each other.

Shutter Speed - Your shutter is a gate that opens and closes to allow light from the outside to come inside of the camera and fall on the film/image sensor. The longer your shutter speed is the more light that’s allowed in and, conversely, how much can be stopped or blocked from coming inside. Consequences of both being a twofold. The first is the exposure of the image, or how bright or dark that it is. The second being the allowance or elimination of movement in your photo. The primary concern typically is to get a photo that’s bright enough without movement being blurred, but there are times when you will want to show movement or blur in your photo such as a waterfall. A fast shutter speed freezes movement while a slower one will blur movement.

Aperture setting - The aperture is a mechanism in the lens that you can adjust to vary the size of the hole that the light goes through as it passes through the lens and into the camera. The larger the hole the more light that can come through in a set amount of time (shutter speed). You can have the same shutter speed but control the amount of light with the aperture. The second consideration when adjusting your aperture is how it affects the depth of field, or how deep the focus is in the photo. When you choose a larger hole, which is represented by a smaller f/stop number, it will give you a smaller or shallow depth of focus, whereas a smaller hole with a larger f/stop number, will give you a larger or deeper depth of focus. One will realize that with a smaller hole for the light to come through a longer shutter speed will be needed to get the same light inside. With a longer shutter speed you will have a chance to blur, as mentioned previously, which will require you to use the third setting in our big three adjustments to further affect the exposure.

The third and last adjustment that we will add to the formula is what was once called “film speed” in film photography, which is indicated by the ASA rating of the film, whereas in digital photography, where there is no film, we adjust the ISO. The film speed indicated how sensitive to light the film is. A lower rating such as 400 ASA will be less sensitive to light than a film rated at 1000 ASA. When the film is more sensitive to light it takes less light to expose the film so you can use the film in darker light or it will allow you to use a faster shutter speed or a smaller aperture opening. With this understanding we can translate the application of this information to digital cameras easily. In digital cameras the film is the image sensor and the film speed is translated to the ISO setting of the camera. The ISO setting varies the sensitivity to light of the image sensor. The beauty of shooting with a digital single lens reflex camera is that you can vary the light sensitivity of the camera using a dial, whereas in film you had to change the whole roll of film. The one consideration when setting the ISO is that the higher the ISO the more grain/noise that you will have in your image.

Let’s summarize what has been covered. You have three settings, shutter speed, aperture opening, and ISO or light sensitivity. All three will affect the each other so you will usually need to adjust another, or both, when one is changed. We can now use this knowledge to set our exposure considering movement, depth of focus and acceptable image noise.

Next, to know how close your exposure is to proper your digital SLR camera comes with a built in light meter. As you set your camera you can keep an eye on the light meter and balance it in the center. Once you have your shutter speed, aperture and your ISO set according to your light meter take your shot.

Once you take your photo you will have a display on the back that will show you a preview of the image. You can check your focus and your composition with this preview of the photo, but you can’t get a real indication of the exposure therefore, the next and last step is to check the exposure with the histogram. The histogram is a graphical representation of the range of light that was captured in your photo. If the histogram doesn’t show automatically with the preview you can find a setting that will allow it. The histogram will look like a rectangular box with a bar chart inside. The left side will be the dark part of your photo such as shadows while the right side will represent the highlights. What you will want to attempt is to balance the highlights and the darks with your “Big 3” adjustments using your histogram as your way of verifying your success. If the settings were a little off, make an adjustment and take another photo. Film is cheap when you’re shooting digital.

All of this may sound a bit confusing at first but the confusion leaves with practice. Like I mentioned previously film is cheap when you’re shooting with a digital camera so go out and take a lot of photos. Therein lies the secret to improving your photography. Practice and experimentation.

It’s my hope for you that your new camera, or your old one for that matter, will provide you with as much fun and life enriching experiences that mine has for me.

Happy New Year.

A Christmas Cabin in The Woods

A Christmas Cabin in The Woods.

A Christmas Cabin in The Woods.

It was late in the day on the eve before Christmas Eve when I decided to drive up to the Little Zigzag River to get some fresh air and take a few photos of the creek in the snow. It was getting dark and I wasn't too pleased with the photos that I took there, but as I was driving back home I passed by this cabin in the forest. It was all lit up and it caught my eye. It was well into the Blue Hour when I stopped for this photo so the warmth of the interior lights contrasted well with the blue snow covered forest vignette.

It goes to show that when one sets his goals on something they ultimate goal may not have been achieved, but you usually get something for your effort.

Dew Drops in The Forest

Dew Drops in The Forest

"You're too close to the trees to see the forest." To which I reply, "Well, sometimes there's more to the forest than just the trees!" First I see a forest, then trees, then leaves, then bark, pine cones, moss, mushrooms, bugs, dew, grains of sand.

Landscape photographers in many cases have Ultra Wide Fever. The want to buy the widest lens that they can buy and include the whole forest sacrificing the complexity and beauty of the details.

Darlene and I were hiking back from a visit to Tamanawas falls when this leaf caught my eye. We stopped and switched our lenses to our macro gear and started shooting these amazing brown drops of water. Apparently a forest tea steeped from the dew from the morning and the juices of the maple leaf.

Sometimes one really should stop and savor the little things in life to be able to enjoy the big picture.

NIKON D350mmf/3.5 - 1/200 sec - ISO 1600. 

The Surge

Yocum Falls near Mount Hood Oregon

The Surge - Below the creek was cold from the melted snow that flowed into it no more than two more miles upstream and it was swift from the rain coming down from above. Standing in the creek seemed to be the best approach to this waterfall, so I pull my Wiggy's Waders on over my boots and rain pants and take my tripod and camera into the stream.

In front of me is the surging waterfall that seemed to send a steady mist toward me spraying the filter on the lens with drops that would accumulate in a matter of seconds. The best approach was to clean the lens with the camera pointed downstream, cover the lens with the rag, swing the camera around, remove the rag, take the shot and spin it back again in a vain attempt at trying to keep the drops out of the photo.

In time I was able to get the focus and the composition set so that when I could perceive the slightest slack in the breeze I could do my spin, reveal and shoot procedure described above. With that methodology, I was able to come home with a photograph.

This was made using my Nikon D810 and my 20mm f/2.8 - 1/8 sec - f/16 - 1000 Iso

Aurora borealis over Mount Hood

Aurora borealis over Mount Hood

The aurora borealis over Mount Hood at Trillium Lake August 2015. This was an incredible night. The skies were great and the lodge only had one invasive light that I was able to brush out of the photo easily.

I've been asked a lot about seeing the aurora here in Oregon after seeing one of these photos. I explain that although you can see them with the naked eye, the camera absorbs more light than you eyes are able to. Therefore, these photos don't represent accurately how you're able to see the lights. So don't be disappointed if you go in search of the aurora and you can't see it. If it's forecasted to be displayed that night take a test shot or two just in case.

It was this night when I met two young women that were there enjoying the stars with one of the women asking me questions about photographing at night. I had yet to start to take any photos and gave her a quick two minute night photography tutorial. We got her all setup with her camera and tripod, took the first shot and looked at the preview screen. The image showed the northern lights as they were just starting to flare up. The woman practically freaked out when she saw the photo. I had to explain to her what was going on. She was amazed.

Once I was done with the two ladies there I went to get a few photos of my own, this being one.

To learn more about Gary CLICK HERE.

 

Aurora Borealis Over the Knik River Alaska

Aurora Borealis Over the Knik River

This is a photo of the aurora borealis over the Knik River and the Chugach Mountains near Butte Alaska.

This photo was taken August 25th, 2013 at 3:09 am. I had just arrived at the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport around midnight that night on my first trip to Alaska and I was already photographing the northern lights. My purpose was to get to know Darlene first, and to photograph this amazing state second. Darlene and I had been on a couple dinner dates on a few of her trips to Oregon but we had never really spent a lot of time together doing what we both enjoy, hiking and taking photos.

From the airport we drove to her cabin on the Knik River. We were sitting at her table when she was describing where she lived, the layout of the land, mountains, proximity to the Knik River etc when I suggested that we grab our cameras and tripods and go to the river. Darlene agreed so off we went. We spent the next week travelling around from the Kenai to the Mat-Su Valley to Denali NP taking photos of the amazing landscapes there. We would eat, sleep and start over the next day with a mission.

As we left the light of her cabin and into the forest behind we followed a path, me in front with Darlene right behind explaining where to go, under a bright half moon when as my eyes adjusted I saw a green glow in the sky through the trees. I yelled "aurora!" amd started running down the trail toward the river oblivious of the chances of a bear or even worse a bull moose crossing my path.

This particular night was an amazing night for me. I fell in love that night. Within three hours I was standing on the edge of a glacial river in Alaska with a beautiful woman and a sky dancing with bands of green aurora.This is how Alaska greeted me that night and Alaska has blessed me with such amazing experiences ever since.

As we got to the river's edge, this was the view. Can you fault me for falling in love? 🙂

Learn more about Gary CLICK HERE 

The Plight of A Photographer in 1912

A Photographer in 1912

A Photographer in 1912 - It seems that not a lot has changed since the old days of photography. This poor fellow lays it all on the line with his sign. It reads:

AMATEURS PLIGHT

  1. CAMERA.
  2. TRIPOD.
  3. PLATES.
  4. DEVELOPER.
  5. FIXER.
  6. CARDS.
  7. TRAYS.
  8. RED WORKING LIGHT.

MONEY ALL GONE
BUSTED
IF YOU WANT A PICTURE
COUGH UP 10¢ IN ADVANCE
U WILL GET ONE SURE
DONT SAY GIMME ONE
IT DONT SOUN GOOD.
-PHOTOGRAPHER

Sunday Driver Photographers – Stopping Along the Way

A Sunday Drive

Have you ever been driving down a country road and glanced to the side and then slammed your brakes, put it reverse, jumped out to snap a photo and then drive on? A photographer can be the worse Sunday Driver to get behind when the light is right unless they're in a hurry to get somewhere in particular. This is not the case in this situation. On this morning I had a non photography destination in mind but decided to take the long way instead of the highway with the commuter crowd, which took me away from traffic and through rural settings about sunrise.

As I drove I glanced to my right and saw this pass by. Because I was the only one on the road at that moment I decided in a split second to pull over get the shot. I'm glad that I did. Not only did I get a nice photo that morning, but the break from driving allowed me to relax, breath in the fresh air and enjoy the rest of my journey.

This is just a simple roadside scene at sunrise on a beautiful Autumn day.

Learn more about Gary CLICK HERE

Fishing with Meadow Muffin

Columbia River Sunset

I thought that I would post one of the very first digital landscape photos that I made. Anything that I did prior to this was terrible due to the primitive cameras that I had. And the photo can't be truly appreciated without a side story about Fishing with Meadow Muffin.

This photo struck me when I looked at it on the computer. This is before I was using any post processing software on my photos, and I certainly had not discovered raw files. I took this on Auto as a jpeg. But it stirred something inside that I have yet to recover from. I've been chasing digital landscape photography with vigor ever since. This is why I tell people that settings matter little. Go out and take pictures.!!

This photo was taken in September of 2003. I was fishing on the Columbia River near Sundial Beach with my good friend Ron "Meadow Muffin" McComber. We were sturgeon fishing. As we were coming back to the boat launch the sunset exploded in this amazing red. I had to get some photos of it. My life has never been the same since that day.

Some may question Ron's nickname. Ron and I go way back. His family and my family were neighbors back when we lived in the little Columbia River Gorge town of Bridal Veil. Back then sturgeon fishing and drinking cans of Hamm's was our favorite past time, both of which we've grown out of, well Ron still fishes but his Hamm's days have passed. But either way, we all had nicknames for each other. We never called each other by our real names while we were fishing, and everyone that we went with had one. I can't attest to how he got the name because I didn't give it to him, but I can tell you how I got mine.

My nickname back then was Hairball. Yep... and back then I had short hair. The name didn't come from my hair, or any hair for that matter, but it came from the first time that I tried casting a 12 foot bank rod with 100# test nylon monofilament and a glob of rag mop (pickled herring) and some earthworms on it. For those unfamiliar with casting with a levelwind the size of a truck winch, let me try to explain.

The first thing that you have to realize is that you have to cast wayyy out there. I'm talking a cast that's about 20 or 30 yards or more, depending one one's ability usually. For that you have to really have your technique down to a science to get the fishing rod to throw the bait that far. While you're casting the line out of the reel you have to make sure that the spool doesn't get ahead of the line that's paying out because if you do you are liable to get the nickname "Hairball". The line going out meets the line wrapping the other way and you end up with this huge ball of twine and a sore thumb.

That's exactly what happened to me. Nobody warned me that the 100 pound monofilament line creates a lot of friction between it and your thumb while you're trying to keep some drag on it. It heats up to somewhere a few degrees less than the sun, and when it did I picked up my thumb from the reel and all kinds of fishing hell broke lose. I had loops of fishing line flying in all directions until it all wound up in a knot the size of my fist.

Needless to say I had a mess to sort out. Luckily a sturgeon didn't grab the bait or it would have brought me in... or most likely my friend's fishing rod. I learned quickly why Ron had a crochet hook in his fishing tackle box. They come in handy when trying to disassemble a hairball in a fish reel.

I need to call up my buddy Meadow Muffin and see how he's doing. We always have fun dredging up the past.

To learn more about Gary CLICK HERE.

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