Amazing White River Falls & Celestial Falls Oregon

White River Falls Oregon

White River Falls and Celestial Falls Oregon

White River Falls in the background and Celestial Falls in the foreground on the White River near the town of Tygh Valley Oregon.

White River has its source on the southeast side of Mount Hood and its terminus at its confluence with the Deschutes River just north of the town of Maupin.  It’s located about 35 miles south of The Dalles.

At the base of the falls is an old abandoned hydroelectricity generation plant which was active from 1910 to 1960.

You can learn more at the Oregon State Parks website.

 

 

Panther Creek Falls Washington

Panther Creek Falls

Panther Creek Falls Washington during high water.

It was a great day to visit this waterfall. I had tried to drive to the trail two weeks prior and was stopped by fallen trees and unmelted snow. In the meantime the road had been cleared and so Darlene and I decided to drive up and give it a look. I’m glad that we did. With the high Spring runoff from the snow and the rain has made the creeks and waterfalls very full and powerful. This particular waterfall has areas to the right side of the normal fall that become a water curtain when the water becomes high. These were the conditions that I sought.

As I approached the falls the view through the trees was breathtaking as it appeared as a soft, bright diffused veil of water past shadows from the trees. When I broke through the trees and walked down to the water’s edge the mist was soaking. I had to cover my gear to keep it reasonably dry. The rocks were very slippery and because I was down there alone didn’t push my limits much.

The compositions from there are a little bit limited but conditions make a big difference, and this amazing curtain of water at the right side of the main falls, which is not there in normal water flow, was pretty incredible and made a unique photo for this location. The sun and the mist would play on each other as each one changed in time.

Just a quick word about photographing this location. Be aware that there’s a viewing platform at the top of the falls that most folks view this scene from. The more adventurous and capable can take a steep and slippery slop to the bottom, but please beware if you attempt this, especially when it’s wet.

 

Oregon Rain Forest

Oregon Rain Forest

The Oregon Rain Forest – This photograph speaks of what Oregon means to me. My earliest memories are of sitting at the edge of an Oregon creek fishing for trout with my father and the smell of the forest and the sound of the creek as it tumbles over the top of mossy rocks and logs. It hasn’t mattered where I have been in the world in my life Oregon was still home to me. These creek side memories had a lot to do with my yearning to return home. They’re a peaceful place and make wonderful landscape photos.

This photograph was taken in the Mt Hood National Forest near the little town of Rhododendron Oregon. It was made on May 21st of 2016. This shows the lush green moss covered forest at it’s Springtime prime.  It’s a time of the year that the forest is the most alive. It’s as if everything that lives there is celebrating the warmer weather and the passing of Winter. Everything from the smallest insect to the largest bear, moss to trees they all are reaching for the light. It’s the lushest and the greenest. The creeks are full and the leaves fill the voids of every corner and every gully. I love photographing the forest in the Spring time.

This shot was made with my Nikon D810 with a 24-85 f/3.5. The exposure was 0.8 sec at an aperture of f/20 and 800 ISO. I used a polarizing filter to reduce glare. Raw conversion was in Lightroom with basic exposure and contrast adjustments, lens correction, CA correction and basic sharpening and NR, and the processing was then finished in Photoshop with a thin Orton layer and final sizing and sharpening.

Contact me for photography instruction including private workshops for camera operation or processing.

 

The Painted Hills in The Darkness

Painted Hills at Night

The Painted Hills in The Darkness.

As we drove away from this amazing place after a beautiful sunset. I had to stop and look back on the hills one more time.

Come back and look at this photo at night time if you’re viewing in a bright room to see all of the rich colors and details.

Nikon D810
Nikon 70-200 @ 135mm
1.6″ exp
f/2.8
200 ISO
Handheld steadied by the roof of the car.

A Cabin in The Woods

Gary Randall Real Estate Photography

Could you feel comfortable in a cabin in the woods like this?

This is just one of the rustic early 20th Century cabins that are situated in the forest around Mount Hood. This particular cabin is in the little town of Rhododendron.

Located in the Mt Hood National Forest you are guaranteed that you won’t have a condo built next door. A long term lease comes with the contract when one purchases a Forest Service Cabin.

This particular cabin was built in 1936 and was most likely board and batten construction. It still has the original stone fireplace thought to have been constructed by a local stoneworker George Pinner. Through the years an addition was built to the back which contains the kitchen, bathroom and a bedroom which increases the livability of this vintage cabin. The way that it’s configured now it has a master bedroom and two lofts with beds.

The cabin is positioned above a year ’round creek the sound of which can be heard throughout the cabin. It has a deck, part of which is covered, that allows one to enjoy the view in any weather. It’s accessible in the Winter and is within a short distance to the small town of Rhododendron and the village’s store and restaurants, yet still removed from evidence of the hustle and bustle of the real world.

The cabin is also within a short walk to amazing hiking trails that take you deep within the Mt Hood Wilderness Area. It’s also a short drive “up the hill” on Highway 26 to the ski resorts in the Winter or the high alpine hiking trails on Mount Hood.

In this busy world I’m sure that I could feel comfortable in a cabin in the woods like this.

Anyone that’s looking to purchase a vacation cabin in or around the Mt Hood National Forest contact my friend Blythe Creek.

Contact me for your real estate photography needs.

Oneonta Gorge Oregon

Oneonta Gorge
 The amazing Oneonta Gorge is the incredible Columbia River gorge on a sunny day.
 
This is an area of exceptional beauty, but it’s one that’s being loved to death. The hoards of people that have been visiting this location have been having a negative impact on this special place. The last time that I was in there I saw graffiti scraped into the moss and lichen on the face of a rock. I have taken out garbage and broken glass. It’s sad that people can go out to see this beauty and want to damage it. There are things in this life that I’m sure that I will never understand.
 
The last that I heard the US Forest Service is trying to come up with a plan to try and mitigate the damage from the volume of traffic in there during the summer months. They have yet to come up with a plan.
 
If you are going out to the gorge consider coming out before 10am. The crowds seem to sleep in. Consider carpooling or using transit buses. Stay on established trails and avoid “user trails”. Not only do they cause damage to the forest, they can lead you to dangerous areas.
 
If you see people abusing the gorge suggest to them the proper way to enjoy the area. If they’re causing trouble and you don’t feel comfortable note details and report them to the US Forest Service.
 
Enjoy but protect our amazing Columbia River Gorge.
 
#oregon #columbiarivergorge #oneontagorge #hiking 

Tips for Better Holiday Photos

Holiday Photos

With the holiday season here many of us will be taking more photos than we typically do throughout the year. Family dinners, Christmas mornings and, in many cases, the one time of the year that we spend time quality time with our friends and family. Photos of these times can be priceless treasures in the future. Just a little bit of thought and preparation can make sure that you get the shot and make an image that more beautiful or impactful. With this in mind there are a few easy to master techniques that will help you to do this.

Fill your frame – Either move closer or zoom in to fill the frame to exclude all that could clutter or distract from the image. With either a planned group photo or a close up of someone move or zoom in. If you are taking a photo of a child opening a gift, for instance, make sure that it’s a closeup to include their gift and their face to capture the whole context and emotion of the moment. A wide angle view of the room won’t be able to capture the moment in the same way.

_gar3520-2Mind the background – Be aware of the background behind your subject. If there’s clutter or a group of people not meant to be in the frame, for instance, find a nicer background. Move your subject or subjects in front of some holiday lights, Christmas tree or decorations. You can also blur the background. One way to do that, if you have a camera that you can adjust manually, is to open up the aperture, set to a smaller number, which will make the depth of field shallower which will soften the background or stand back from your subject and zoom in. Most of the time this should give you a similar effect.

Use fill flash, or not – A general rule with digital cameras is to use flash if your subject is standing in front of a bright background such as a window. Unless the room is very dark try to get the shot without a fill flash. This will give you a more even tone and natural looking photograph.

_gar3736-2Use the timer and a tripod – You should be in the photo too. It’s most always been the case that, when sharing your photos, you will need to explain that you were there but was taking the photo. Why not be in the shot? Learn how to use the timer on your camera. You can usually set it for anything from 10 seconds to 30 seconds or more to allow you to click the shutter button and casually walk around into the shot with time to smile. It’s usually very simple to set the camera quickly to Self Timer and then back again. Set your camera on a tripod if you have one, otherwise find something sturdy that you can set the camera on while the shot is taken.

Video – You can be a videographer. Most digital cameras these days will allow you to create videos simply. Most cases all you need to do is flip a switch and press a button. Once you are videoing you can zoom in and out. Once you have made your videos you can easily download them to your computer and edit them in various programs that come with most all personal computers. Apple products can use iMovie while Windows users can use Windows Movie Maker and either brands can use many aftermarket programs as well. Both programs are easy to use and have many tutorials videos available online.

I hope that these tips will help you to get the shot that may have gotten away. The most important tip of all is to get the camera out, charge the batteries, learn to use your settings prior to your event and make sure that it’s handy so you can grab it when the opportunity to save a moment for posterity is provided. Time is fleeting, memories are treasures. Take more pictures this holiday season.

Gateway to Cold Spring Creek

Cold Spring Creek

Gateway to Cold Spring Creek

I stand at the window to the light of the universe, the smell of the earth, the sound of a dynamic reality and the sight of beautiful, precious life.
 
This is only one of many spots to get a shot along Cold Spring Creek beside the trail to Tamanawas Falls, a 100 foot tall waterfall in the Mt Hood National Forest on the east side of Mount Hood. As an outfitter and guide, this is only one of the many creeks and waterfalls that I am able to take my clients to.

Playful Little Bears

Gary, Darlene and the Denali Bus

_gar7140-2I love Denali. This last trip in August was my second trip into the park and this trip was the best. The skies were clear which allowed for a great view of Denali the mountain as well as the animals roaming the early Autumn tundra.

For those unaware, when you explore within the park you use a shuttle bus. You make reservations, buy a ticket and off you go. You can choose your destination, the two most popular being Eielson visitor center and Wonder Lake. As you drive through the park you are able to get on or off as you wish and catch a ride on another that will, in time, pass by. I really enjoy riding the bus. It can be a bit crowded at times, and a little dusty on a dry day, but it’s a good and practical way to get around inside of the park. The best part is that the bus drivers are all experts on the park and its wildlife and are great at interpreting everything from the history to geography as well as information on the animals that call Denali their home.

29331716115_566e748be7_oAs we were travelling along on the bus the driver stopped at the sight of a brown bear and her two cubs. They were on an opposing ridge about 500 yards away. Far enough for us to easily observe their behavior. On this morning they were traversing the ridge eating blueberries. They acted as if they had no care in the world. It was an amazing experience.

bear-006At first we saw the sow and only one of her cubs but within a few minutes we observed another little bear behind a bush and working it’s way up the ridge and toward the others. At the same time the mamma and her cub roamed to another area of fresh berry bushes. In time the adventurous little bear made its way to the top of the ridge and started to make his way toward his mamma and his sibling. It was fun to watch. The mamma bear and the first little cub paid the other cub no mind and kept eating berries.

As we watched them I noticed adventure cub moving in on his sibling and a moment later he attacked. They both started tumbling down the hill in a ball of fur and legs.

At the end of the day we saw a variety of animals. Everything from bears to caribou, moose, sheep and even a wolf, but the two little bear cubs was the highlight of the trip.

Upper Trail Lake at Moose Pass Alaska

Upper Trail Lake Kenai Alaska
 A front row seat to the light show at Upper Trail Lake at Moose Pass on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska.
 
The story behind this shot… Darlene and I had scouted this location out earlier in the day and then drove in the Seward to get a room for the night and some food in our bellies. We returned about dusk to wait for the show. When we arrived there were two guys there with their tent set up.
 
We parked and I approached them and said hello. They were from Germany and were touring British Columbia and Alaska by car. They flew in to Vancouver, bought a cheap used car and hit the road.
 
We had a great time visiting and shooting the aurora. Darlene wasn’t feeling so well that night and so as she was sitting above and behind she decided to take a photo of us down by the shore. When she showed me the shot I had to do it too, of course. 🙂 This is my version of the scene with our new German friends and Darlene standing at the shoreline getting their shots of the aurora.
 
The other detail that might complete this scene was that there was a beaver who would swim past every now and then and slap his tail on the water to try to chase us away.
 
Props to Darlene for standing back and capturing the scene and not just the scenery. 🙂