Pacific Northwest Rhododendron Season

Mount Hood Oregon Rhododendrons

It’s rhododendron season again on Mount Hood. The “rhodies” are revered here on The Mountain as they are, most likely, the most popular wildflower that blooms around us. We even have a town that is named for the beautiful pink flowers that line our roads every Springtime. They’re very photogenic and my wife Darlene and I are always glad to see rhododendron season arrive. 

The name rhododendron is derived from the ancient Greek words for rose and tree. Of course rhododendrons are neither a rose nor a tree. They’re a part of a genus of over 1000 species of woody plants in the heather family. They’re found mainly in Asia but are also widespread in the mountains of the American Pacific Northwest as well as in the highlands of the Appalachian Mountains. Azalea are related to rhododendrons. Rhododendrons have been domesticated and come in many colors, but the natives are a beautiful blushing pink. Many homes in the area have domestic rhododendrons of varying colors in their yards, but the beautiful native flowers are my favorite. 

Rhododendrons are so beautiful that they seem to be out of place in the forest. I have been asked several times by those friends not from here if they were planted along the highways as a beautification project. Of course these beautiful flowers also grow far from roads throughout the forest but they love sunshine. You can find them growing along the roads because of that. They also love burned areas or even clear cut forests. You can find places where they cover a clearing in the forest. As photographers we can capitalize on that by going to a clearing with a beautiful view of Mount Hood for our photo. But these beautiful flowers will also grow in the forests among the trees with beautiful columns of trees surrounding them. Many views can be found by taking a hike on many of the trails in the area. Or even by taking a drive on some of the forest roads that are near us. 

They are beautiful in a wide angle photo as well as a macro photo. The flower’s pastel pink blossoms, in contrast with a beautiful blue sky, are a perfect color combination and when blended with a beautiful snow capped peak. This creates a classic composition fit for a calendar or a postcard or even a framed photo for your living room. 

And furthermore the bear grass blooms along with the rhododendrons on a typical year. The shape of these flowers, with their stem shooting up from the ground and their hundreds of small, white sparkle like blossoms flaring out into an orb reminds me of fireworks bursting in the sky. 

There’s really not a lot more to say about these beautiful flowers besides my encouragement to take some time to appreciate this local flower that represents the beauty of our forests. 

To make this photo I took focus stacked five images due to how near the minimum focus distance the flowers were. This allowed

Midnight Photoshoot by Candlelight

Will at Stonehenge

I received an inquiry late last Summer from Billy Kyle the singer from the Portland Oregon Metal band Will telling me that they had seen a Milky Way photo that I had taken from the Stonehenge replica in the Columbia River Gorge near Maryhill Washington and was wondering if I could photograph their band at night there. I had a full schedule of workshops but had a day after a videography job in the Eastern Oregon town of Halfway when I was able to do it so we set a date to meet.

Will at Stonehenge
Will at Stonehenge

I had arrived home the day before from eastern Oregon, unloaded my gear and repacked my gear for the photo session before getting some rest and loading back up to head out. I arrived and Billy Kyle and the other band members were there. They had a few props and some excellent red capes that were perfect for the dark medieval theme that we had planned for the shoot. Something reminiscent of an ancient Pict or Druid ceremony.

Will at Stonehenge
Will at Stonehenge

Prior to the photoshoot I had planned on throwing some soft light onto them from some remote flashes. I did a few test shots with the gear that I had brought but the band had brought some candles along with them. We decided to take some shots lit just with the candles, and they nailed the look that we were hoping for. Not only were the candles a part of the shot but their light was the right temperature and gave the scene the right organic feel that helped to make this seem ancient. The architecture of the Stonehenge replica in the dim light gave it a stone castle feel.

Will at Stonehenge
Will at Stonehenge

The only challenge was trying to get quick enough exposures without underexposing the shot. Even at some fairly high ISO's these were dim, but with some help from the steady nerves of the band we came away with some images that we were all proud of.

Will at Stonehenge
Will at Stonehenge

Will has a new album coming out. They plan on using a couple of these shots for the artwork. The rest they'll use to promote the band as well as their music. I couldn't have worked with a nicer, more professional group of musicians. They were all enthusiastic even in the cold of the night.

If you like dark metal music, please go check out Will. https://vvill.bandcamp.com/releases

The Weeping Walls Autumn Color

Weeping Walls Columbia River Gorge, Oregon

This is an off trail location on Eagle Creek in the Columbia River Gorge near the little town of Cascade Locks, Oregon. This area was affected severely by 2017's Eagle Creek Fire. I feel fortunate to have been able to photograph many of the areas that are now closed to hiking.

Although the Eagle Creek Trail is still closed at the time that I write that, the US Forest Service hopes to have the trail reopened soon.

Although Springtime workshops will be delayed Autumn workshops are still a go. Contact me for more information.

Multnomah Falls Emerging From The Veil

Multnomah Falls

Multnomah Falls through the Columbia River Gorge mist

Multnomah Falls is more than iconic and easily recognized by most anyone who sees it. Even if they don't know the name, there's a good chance that they've at least seen the waterfalls in a painting or a photo before.

I find that the one best variable in determining how beautiful the waterfall is on a particular day is the weather. And in the case of Multnomah Falls, sometimes bad weather is good. On this particular day the waterfall was emerging from a low layer of clouds and everything was lush and wet and green. The rain had dominated that day but it certainly didn't hinder our photography.

Nikon D810 - 28mm - f/14 - 3 sec - ISO 64 - CP filter

Fantasy Forest

Fantasy Forest

A day in the Mt Hood National Forest

Here's my first photo of 2020… and the first photo after my stroke, taken not far from where I live.

It's kinda funny but while I was going through the stroke I was thinking of potential consequences from the damage that the stroke could cause and if I would still be able to go out and stand in a creek and take a photo. I'm serious. I wasn't afraid of dying. I was afraid of living but without photography. Thankfully I've been blessed to be able to go back to what I love with, perhaps, a new and fresh purpose.

This is a photo of a creek in the Mount Hood National Forest. The moss is in its Winter color and the leaves have left the trees, but the forest is no less beautiful than it is any other time of the year.

I had an exceptional this day with my good friend Chris Byrne and his friend Bronwyn. I needed this day so bad. I was back in my realm doing what I'm meant to do. I was so happy. Thank you Chris. I appreciate all that you do for me.

Christmas Valley Oregon

Christmas Valley Oregon

Christmas Valley Oregon - I love the diversity of landscape in Oregon. We have most everything that a landscape photographer could want to photograph. Oregon has a pretty awesome ocean coastline abutted against forested mountains and hills, valleys, glacial peaked mountains, sage and juniper high desert plains, low elevation desert mud playas and a canyon that’s deeper than the Grand Canyon – Hells Canyon on the Idaho border. We also have windswept sand dunes, not just along the coastline, but right in the center of the state in Central Oregon.

Christmas Valley Sand Dunes in Central Oregon are some of the remnants of the catastrophic volcanic explosion of Mount Mazama just 7000 years ago that blew 1600 meters (almost a mile in elevation) of the 12,000 foot (3700 meter) mountain completely off, creating a caldera that contains the iconic 1,943 foot (592 meter) deep Crater Lake,  that we know today. The Christmas Valley sand is composed of ash and pumice that was ejected during the eruption. Although the dunes are majestic on their own, they’re only a small part of the evidence of an event that changed what we know as Oregon forever, and greatly affected the people who lived there.

What's thought provoking to me is the fact that humans were in the area and were witness to this event. Incredibly preserved reed sandals have been unearthed in a cave near the little town of Fort Rock not far from Christmas Valley that have been dated from 9000 to 13000 years old. Life for the native Klamath people in the area changed forever after the massive eruption. Their legends tell of an angry battle between Llao, their "Chief of the Below World" who inhabited Mount Mazama (Giiwas in the Native American Klamath language), and his rival Skell, their "Chief of the Above World". Llao fell in love with a beautiful Klamath maiden but she refused his offer of immortality if she would become his wife. This angered Llao and he rained rocks and fire down from the sky onto the people below. During the battle Skell tried to protect the people from above while standing atop Mount Shasta. The battle ended when Skell was able to force Llao back into the mountain. All of this commotion formed the crater on Mount Mazama which filled with torrential rains that followed the battle.

The mountain became sacred ground to the natives and the people were forbidden from going there. Some shaman forbade them from looking in the direction of the mountain. 7000 years ago, all of this would make perfect sense. The human catastrophe and the pure terror that they witnessed must have been something that we as modern humans can hardly understand.

Today we can still witness the effects of the massive geological battle that forms so much of the landscapes that we photograph. I feel that understanding the science as well as the legend of these areas works to enhance our appreciation for them and allows us to better translate their meaning and message through our photos.

The winds in Central Oregon blow with some regularity in this area and create dunes as well as ripples in the sand. The patterns that they create are perfect for a photographic foreground. Unique conditions such as a vivid sunrise or sunset can complete a breathtaking scene.

Christmas Lake, Christmas Valley and nearby Peter's Sink and Peter's Creek were named for pioneer stockman Peter Christman, who grazed his cattle there and had a house at Silver Lake, 18 miles (29 km) to the southwest. The name "Christmas" was an early corruption of the name Christman that became entrenched in the vernacular by 1900.

The Christmas Valley Sand Dunes are administered by the Bureau of Land Management and are easily accessible and are designated as a recreational area for campers and wanderers as well as OHV use. Camping areas are available for extended camping stays. If you find yourself wandering in Central Oregon exploring our amazing public lands a trip to Christmas Valley should be on your list of places to stop and experience. 

Goose Island Lookout at Glacier National Park Montana

Goose Island Lookout in Glacier National Park Montana

It was a windy and stormy day at Goose Island Lookout in Glacier National Park Montana with an incredible display of storm clouds in the sky that mirrored the majestic mountains above them when I took this photograph.

I took this photo with my Nikon D810 - 24mm - 1/25 sec - f/14 - ISO 64

Processing - Adobe Lightroom Raw conversion finished in Adobe Photoshop.

Cannon Beach Oregon Sunset

Cannon Beach Oregon Sunset

Some days I feel that I'm blessed with an inordinate amount of amazing light when I go out to make photos. I can't explain it. I'm not boasting but am simply acknowledging how blessed that I feel. I've never been a very lucky guy. Perhaps I've been saving up my luck to be used where it will make the biggest difference in my life. Certainly photography has brought to me some of the most meaningful returns in all of my life.

I just spent a couple of days at the Oregon Coast with one of my repeat clients this last weekend. What I found remarkable about the reason why he wanted to spend more time with me was that, according to him, all of the photos that he took during his time with me stood out well over those that he took alone or with other guides that he had hired. I was almost speechless. All I could do was thank him while he was thanking me. 😀 "Aww, thank you." "No, seriously, thank you". "No I really mean it. Thank you." "No, thank you.".... 😀 lol

This was the one segment of time that he and I had planned where I was hoping, wishing and praying a bit that the light would arrive on cue, and it certainly did. We were hoping for the best at Cannon Beach and Haystack Rock and it certainly did NOT disappoint with this amazing Cannon Beach Oregon Sunset.

I've been confident of very little in my life, but I have great confidence in the work that I'm doing at this point in my life.

Glacier National Park 2020

Grinnell Point at Swiftcurrent Lake

Well, I finally made it back to Glacier National Park. This time with my good friend Chris Byrne. Chris was conducting a workshop and had a great group with him. I was glad to tag along.

The last time that I went to Glacier I was confronted with cold weather ,snow and ice. I remember camping at Two Medicine Lake on my last day there and getting frozen inside of my Jeep during the night. I woke up to about a 1/2 of an inch of ice covering the whole Jeep. I couldn't see any mountains so I headed back home early.

This time I was met with some pretty epic conditions. We had two incredible sunrises at Swiftcurrent Creek. Travelling from one side of the park to the other via the Going To the Sun Road is always epic, but the skies were so atmospheric. Probably due to the winds at the beginning of the trip kicking up glacial dust into the air.

In all we had seven days to play in this incredible place. Photographing lakes, creeks, waterfalls, amazing mountain peaks as well as wildlife such as moose, deer and even a grizzly bear.

It will be hard to beat this trip, but I can't wait to return to Montana.

The Milky Way Over Mount Hood

The Milky way over Mount Hood

The Milky way over Mount Hood Oregon.

There once was a time when I would stay up for several nights in a row and had no stories worth telling. These days I stay up for one night and have a wonderful story that I could tell.

I could tell about enjoying this warm, calm dark Summer night with a sky full of stars and a snow capped mountain so close it seems as if you can reach out to touch it, with the Milky way above it like a feathery plume from a hat, and then coming home with a photograph that needs no description.

I have so many wonderful stories that I could tell, and so many photos that need no words.

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